NCGE Resources

Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

Developing a Mindful Approach in Guidance Counselling: Care for Self and Others

Paul King, a lecturer in the School of Human Development and Chair of the MSc./Graduate Diploma in Guidance Counselling programmes in Dublin City University (DCU) presents Developing a Mindful Approach in Guidance Counselling: Care for Self and Others in this webinar recording.  
King starts his presentation by highlighting what mindfulness is and what it is not and invites participants to reflect on what mindfulness is for them.  During the webinar King invites participants to engage in a number of mindful practices and to reflect on emerging feelings and thoughts. The nine attitudinal factors of mindfulness practice are presented and two video clips are shown to highlight the role of attention in mindfulness.  
 
King concludes his webinar with an exploration of the ethical issues Mindful Based Interventions and the ‘McDonaldization of Mindfulness’ present.  Parallels between mindfulness and guidance are proposed.  
 
Click below to view the webinar recording.
 
You can dowload the accompanying presentation HERE and at the end of this page
 
 
 
 
Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

The Four Pillars of Action: The Role of Guidance Counsellors in developing and implementing the Whole School Community Approach in Tackling Bullying, both Traditional and Cyber


Bullying at school is a cause of considerable concern to young people and their families. The growth of cyber-bullying has caused further worry and unease. The reason for the growing concern is the impact which cyber-bullying has been shown to have on the mental and physical well-being of young people. The strong connection between ‘traditional’ and cyber-bullying which has the majority of young people involved in both forms means that strategies need to be implemented which are effective with the traditional forms of bullying as well as providing clear and consistent guidelines for healthy cyber-behaviour. The Whole School Community Approach has been identified as having the potential to reduce the prevalence of bullying at school. This article, therefore, raises the need to have Guidance Counsellors central to the development and delivery of the Whole School Community Approach which has been endorsed by the Department of Education and Skills’ 2013 Action Plan on Bullying. The Whole School Community Approach is collaborative and systematic and can embrace both ‘traditional’ and cyber-bullying. Its prevention and intervention strategies involve all school staff, parents, young people and the wider community.

Further Recommended Reading

Countering Bully/Victim Problems in Schools: Supporting the Guidance Counsellor by Conor Mc Guckin and Lucie Corcoran should be read in conjunction with this article. 

It can be found here in "Delivering the guidance programme" section.

 

Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

Anger Management in the Classroom

This article seeks to explore the reasons and motivations behind inappropriate expressions of anger, and how these can be successfully addressed. The article begins by looking at anger as a developmental and skills deficit perspective and recognises that not all anger is the same, but there are different forms and motivations behind anger. Each type of anger needs to be addressed differently, and the article explores a number of approaches that include cognitive behavioural techniques, conflict resolution strategies, and mindfulness and relaxation training. It may be concluded that each of these approaches is effective, but that their efficacy depends on context, type, and function of the anger, and it is vital to include the student in this process if any strategy is to be successful.

Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

Self-Care: Some Prescriptions for Calm Living

Ever felt stressed? Or, in contemporary parlance, stressed-out? While this article is basically about stress or, more accurately, stress-management, you’ll notice that I’ve kept stress out of the title. This is because I want you to focus on what you can do about stress and stressors in your life, rather than on abstract concepts of stress. Hence the article is a bit prescriptive but, I hope, practical in the suggestions, reflections and exercises I outline. These come from lived experience, both personal and professional, during my years as teacher, guidance counsellor, and psychologist. I adorn the general content of my stall with observations from historical figures, and with relevant citations from academic research. Those who work in the broad fields of education, counselling, and psychology constitute the audience I know best, and from whom I’ve learnt most. What I set out here reflects, I hope, some of that learning and its practical applications. If readers from other fields dip in and find it useful, well that’s a bonus.

Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

Bereavement: How Guidance Counsellors Can Support The Grieving Student

Death is inevitable and universal, therefore, it is necessary for anyone who works with students to be prepared to offer help to those who experience bereavement naturally, suddenly, or traumatically. Indeed, help is sometimes required in advance of bereavement, in that a student may be ‘anticipating’ the death of a significant person in their life (e.g., parent in hospice care). It is estimated that between 36,000 and 60,000 young people in Ireland have experienced a significant bereavement (McLoughlin, 2012). As the role of the Guidance Counsellor is pivotal in supporting students who have been bereaved, as well as their peers and the rest of the school community, this article provides a review of the salient information that is useful to a Guidance Counsellor in their planning to provide immediate and on-going support.

The article begins with a discussion of the definitional differences between types of bereavement and followed by an overview of the theoretical foundations of bereavement and grief, showing how the topic has altered over time, reflecting societal changes. Subsequently, attention is directed towards a review of research that has explored the nature, incidence, and correlates of bereavement among students.

Critical to the work of the school-based Guidance Counsellor is the policy framework that guides their work. The article overviews policy documentation that is useful in planning for bereavement provision and support services for students. To conclude, attention is directed towards curricula materials, programmes and resources that are available to help Guidance Counsellors in this important work.

Post date: Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 17:16

Action-oriented Hope-centered Career Development

In this webinar Prof. Spencer Niles presents an action oriented model of career development which places hope at the center of the process.  Niles highlights the three theories of career development which underpin this career development model - Snyder’s Hope Theory, Bandura’s Human Agency Theory and Hall’s Protean Career Theory.  The process employed by the action-oriented hope-centered model is discussed (self-reflection, self-clarity, visioning, goal setting and planning, and implementing and adapting) and sample activities are presented which can be employed to support the career development of individuals and groups. 

 

Niles concludes the webinar by presenting a case study and inviting guidance counsellors to consider how they might help Emily progress her career journey. 

 
Click below to view the webinar recording.
 
You can dowload the accompanying presentation HERE and at the end of this page
 
Further Recommended Viewing

The Accomplishment Interview by Spencer Niles and Kai Helmichk can be viewed in conjunction with this video. It can be found here.